Nursing Homes to Segregate COVID-19 Population

By Doug Chalgian on March 26, 2020

State and Federal entities are taking steps to address the COVID-19 Crisis. Long Term Care Facilities offer some of the most difficult challenges with respect to managing the...

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Legislature Creates New Process for Disputes over Visiting Vulnerable Adults

By Doug Chalgian on January 11, 2020

Michigan guardianship law has been amended to allow probate courts to appoint limited guardians to supervise visitations with incapacitated adults. Specifically, a new section MCL 700.5306(6) provides grounds...

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Reflections from a Costly Goose Chase

By Doug Chalgian on March 3, 2019

The crux of this unpublished opinion is whether the cost of litigation initiated by a conservator that turns out to be a big waste of money, should be...

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Capacity to Nominate

By Doug Chalgian on December 16, 2018

The question is this: When a person who is the subject of a petition for guardianship or conservatorship nominates an individual they want to serve in those capacities,...

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COA Sets the Record Straight on Priorities

By Doug Chalgian on June 8, 2018

This new published Court of Appeals opinion shouldn’t surprise anyone. The COA holds that where a professional guardian/conservator resigns, and the only adult child of the ward petitions...

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Better Than Nothing?

By Doug Chalgian on May 22, 2018

The Michigan Supreme Court has issued an Order denying leave in In Re Conservatorship of Rhea Brody.  However, this same Order “further notes” that the Opinion of the...

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The Imperfect Bandage of Undue Influence

By Doug Chalgian on April 29, 2018

A rant this morning. Something to think about over your Sunday morning coffee (or tea). Our firm starts lawsuits involving vulnerable adult exploitation as much as anyone I suppose....

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Storm Clouds in Elder Law Land

By Doug Chalgian on January 7, 2018

It seems to me that we are living through what could be a case study on the way the law evolves to address a rapidly changing social environment....

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Lay Witness Testimony Regarding Cognitive Impairment

By Doug Chalgian on November 2, 2017

In the recently unpublished Court of Appeals case of Rebecca L. Clemence Revocable Trust (click on name to read the case), the trial judge essentially granted summary disposition...

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Meritless is Good. Frivolous would have been Better.

By Doug Chalgian on October 13, 2017

This is a Chalgian and Tripp case just handed down from the Court of Appeals. Unpublished.  Click here to read In Re Conservatorship of Ueal E. Patrick. Ueal...

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Doug Chalgian

About The Author: Doug Chalgian

I am an estate planning, probate litigating, elder law attorney. This is a blog for clients and professional colleagues. In it I offer my ideas about the state of the law and the practice of law. I believe we are living through a unique period during which the law (which is traditionally slow to change) and society are attempting to evolve to address the explosion of people living long lives. I find these developments fascinating and enjoy being involved in this evolution.